Press Rights Curriculum & Resources

The Law

Articles

Ethics

Articles

Resources/links

Teaching resources

Lessons

  • The importance of students making real decisions using the Yeo vs. Lexington case as an example.

    1. CLICK HERE for a podcast by Carrie Faust podcast on "Issues in Scholastic Media" — "Advertising, free speech and a sound editorial policy in scholastic publications"
    2. CLICK HERE for a lesson plan by Carrie Faust based around the podcast.
    3. CLICK HERE for a lesson plan by Lori King about student press liability also based around the Yeo decision.
  • Understanding obscenity: This presentation goes with a lesson that looks at why student journalists need to understand the vague legal definition of obscenity and their rights and responsibilities surrounding them. This lesson is designed to help students understand the legal issues of obscenity.

    1. CLICK HERE for PDF presentation on obscenity by Marina Hendricks
    2. CLICK HERE for obscenity lesson plan by Lori King
    3. CLICK HERE for "Obsenity in Student Publications" lesson by Carrie Faust
    4. CLICK HERE for worksheet on defamation by Lori King
  • Understanding defamation: Although the risk of high school journalists being sued for libel is small, a thorough grounding in libel is essential to the practice of responsible journalism. This lesson is designed to help students learn about libel, its ramifications and how they should be in a state of constant vigilance (as Mad-Eye Moody of “Harry Potter” fame would advocate) to guard against it. This podcast also help provide a framework for understanding defamation. CLICK HERE for this MP3 file (3.4MB).
  • The case commonly known as Bong Hit s4 Jesus: These two lesson plans present information about the importance of understanding the Morse decision and the effect it could have on your schools.
  • Informed consent: The practice of journalism involves responsibility not only to readers, but also to sources. This lesson prepares students to deal with sources in an ethical manner through class discussion and role-playing in situations they may be called upon to address.
  • An ounce of prevention: While a thorough grounding in the cases that have shaped student press law is essential for young journalists, such knowledge also may have a chilling effect. This lesson is designed to help students think about content, its potential ramifications and how the practice of fair, accurate journalism can be their best defense against censorship and related threats.
  • Lessons and information on important but non-Supreme Court decisions: Materials on these decisions include a presentation in Beyond Hazelwood and Tinker and another on how different factors led to different decisions in different courts. There is also a lesson plan on the topic
  • Understanding how to use legal citations: Carrie Faust presents information about how to use and understand legal citations in understanding court decisions in this 132KB PDF presentation based on material from Law of the Student Press.
  • Photographers and the right to privacy: This PowerPoint and lesson present both information and situations about photographers and the right to privacy.
  • Privacy and copyright: This PowerPoint explores these two important legal issues.

Articles

  • Heathy skepticism is good: This article examines why journalists should not believe all they hear.
  • First Amendment and school pubs: This article suggests why practicing the First Amendment is important in schools
  • Criteria for evaluating advisers: This article outlines guidelines for evaluating advisers, guidelines that don't include tying evaluations to student content.
  • Questions about scholastic journalism: This article states and then answers questions about scholastic journalism, censorship and the law.
  • Short arguments against censorship: This article summarizes arguments against censorship.
  • Lesson plan for FOI Act and using it: This plan by a Kent State University prospective teacher looks at how to use FOI requests.
  • On objectivity: This article summarizes journalistic objectivity as seen in The Elements of Journalism.

Resources/links

  • Five-minute lesson plans: This link leads to ideas for First Amendment lesson plans.
  • General journalism links: This link lists sites and organizations with important scholastic journalism information.
  • Journalistic principles: This link lists guidelines about principles of journalism.
  • Journalism issues: This link provides links to a multitude of important journalism topics and issues.
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