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C:JET Volume 45, 2011-2012

Summer 2012, Vol. 45, #4
Click here to purchase the Summer 2012, Vol. 45, #4 issue of the JEA magazine

Cover photo by Charlie Hunnicutt, Bryant (Ark.) High School

Cover photo by Charlie Hunnicutt, Bryant (Ark.) High School

  • Election 2012 — With a heated battle under way for the Republican presidential nomination, the 2012 election promises to be one of the most expensive and heated battles of recent times. | Content from Bradley Wilson, CJE, Malena Carollo, Joel Quinones, Elizabeth Wilson and Gage Skidmore
  • Ambrotypes — This antique process uses plates dipped in light-sensitive solution and provides a unique experience for photographers. Complete with a ready-to-use, cross-discipline exercise and hands-on digital exercise. | By Bradley Wilson, CJE
  • Good websites — From Prince George High School in Virginia, trnwired.org is an example of a thorough website that makes full use of online media from video to PDF archives. | With Wayne Epps Jr., Kevin Harris and Olivia Tritschler
  • AP Style updates — Recent updates to the Associated Press Stylebook include entries dealing with elections and financial issues.
  • The big story — To produce more than simply a superficial story, reporters need to hang around long enough to learn about the characters, the plot and the setting. | By Scott Winter
  • Modern design — The Wings yearbook in California is known for its contemporary look and feel. It also features unique coverage using stories, photography and alternative story forms. | With Cameron Wilson, editor, and Crystal Kazmierski, adviser
  • Instruction Common Core — Journalism courses can be invaluable in helping high school students meet all of the 22 competencies defined in the common core, regardless of how individual states interpret them. | By Jack Kennedy, MJE

CLICK HERE for the online feature accompanies the feature package in the Summer 2012 issue of JEA’s magazine, Communication: Journalism Education Today, vol. 45, no. 4.


Spring 2012, Vol. 45, #3
Click here to purchase the Spring 2012, Vol. 45, #3 issue of the JEA magazine

Cover photo by Chad Phillips, Andover (Kan.) High School

  • Teaching with Facebook — With more than 800 million active users, students today live at least some of their lives in Facebook. Educators need to make use of Facebook as a place where today’s students interact. | By Bradley Wilson, CJE
  • Thanks, Steve — Steve Jobs was an innovator who transformed classrooms, journalism labs and personal computing. He created a culture that encouraged “outside the box” thinking in the personal computing industry. | By Bobby Hawthorne
  • Design — Design, don’t decorate. Begin with reading the story and attempt to echo its tone by using design. A former designer for the Las Vegas Sun recommends ways to approach Page One design. | By Kyle Ellis
  • Research Key Findings — The Center for Scholastic Journalism released findings of research done last fall. | Research by Candace Perkins Bowen, MJE; Mark Goodman and Piotr Bobkowski
  • Top Stories of 2011 — Based on a survey of JEA members, top stories included everything from the death of Osama bin Laden to the final launch of the space shuttle.
  • Good Websites — The Niles West News and Newsstreak are two inviting websites in high school media. Advisers and students offer commentary about what makes the two sites useful.
  • It’s Tangerine — Annually, Pantone names a color of the year. In 2011, it was a pink honeysuckle. In 2012, it is a bright orange, tangerine, a color Pantone describes as provocative.

CLICK HERE for the online feature accompanies the feature package in the Spring 2012 issue of JEA’s magazine, Communication: Journalism Education Today, vol. 45, no. 3.


CJET Cover Winter 2011

Cover photo by Jessy Haaven, Horizon High School, Scottsdale, Ariz.

  • Living in a world of conflicts — Journalists need to avoid conflict of interest. Participants are sources, not writers. But recognizing and then avoiding conflicts is easier said than done in a scholastic environment. | By Glenn Morehouse Olson, CJE
  • Working in social media — Journalists have had to adapt to the reality social media bring to the practice of journalism. Online tools introduce ethical and legal challenges to the classroom and to the mass media environment. | By Trevor Ian, Howard Spanogle
  • Remembering Sept. 11 — As their professional counterparts did, scholastic papers and websites published content looking back at the Attack on America, Sept. 11, 2001.
  • Shooting 10 must-have images — Capturing images that are daunting, powerful and compelling should become a routine part of every photo assignment as photojournalists capture scenesetting images and quiet moments as well as honest emotion and action. CLICK HERE for an online sidebar. | By Eric Thomas, MJE
  • Profiting off the Web — SmugMug is but one tool that can help schools profit from their online presence by making photographs available for sale online. SmugMug does all the work in a customizable online format. | By Bryan Farley
  • Mentoring a complex experience — A relationship between a mentor and a mentee is based upon mutual trust and respect to support growth and autonomy for both parties involved. | By Linda Barrington, MJE, Kara Asmussen
  • Advertisers — Alabama Scholastic Press Assn., Columbia Scholastic Press Assn., Dow Jones News Fund, Freedom Forum, Friesens, FutureBook Yearbooks Inc., JS Printing, Kent State University, Knowledge News Network, School Newspaper Online, Sheri Campbell, Southern Interscholastic Press Assn.

CLICK HERE for the online feature accompanies the feature package in the winter 2011 issue of JEA’s magazine, Communication: Journalism Education Today, vol. 45, no. 2.


Fall 2011, Vol. 45, #1
Click here to purchase the Fall 2011, Vol. 45, #1 issue of the JEA magazine

Cover photos by students in the JEA Write-off competitions

Cover photos by students in the JEA Write-off competitions

  • Reviving the passion — A JEA yearbook adviser of the year shares her convictions: Journalists make a difference as they keep people informed, and journalism advisers make a difference as they train leaders. | By Nancy Hastings, MJE
  • Improving writing about the arts — Erin Hart, theater-critic-turned mystery writer, vividly illustrates the importance of listening and seeing to achieve the best arts coverage, from one-act plays to big-time concerts. | By Glenn Morehouse Olson, CJE
  • Playing with light, on stage — Photo examples, tech info and practical suggestions combine for a mini-course in ways to produce photos that bring shouts of bravo from readers. The problem-solution approach can lead to dramatic theatrical photos. | By Glenn Morehouse Olson, CJE
  • Training journalists as critics — Melissa Koch, director of Education and Community Engagement for Hennepin Theatre Trust, details how to train journalists as thoughtful communicators about entertainment. | By Glenn Morehouse Olson, CJE; Laurie Hansen, CJE
  • Promoting in-depth arts reporting — Editors can turn entertainment pages into a must-read section by developing a comprehensive strategy for coverage. Timely choices are endless. Spotlights an interview with enthusiastic Minneapolis arts editor Tad Simons. | By Judy Babb; Howard Spanogle
  • Using software to make a collage — Say goodbye to designing a time-consuming and laborious photo collage. Say hello to Shape Collage, which makes the job easy online or as stand-alone software. | By Bradley Wilson, CJE
  • Advertisers — Advertisers in this issue included Alabama Scholastic Press Assn., Ball State University, Dow Jones News Fund, Freedom Forum, Friesens, FutureBook Yearbooks Inc., Goodheart-Willcox, Herff Jones, Journalism Education Association, JS Printing, Kent State University and School Newspapers Online.

CLICK HERE for the online feature accompanies the feature package in the fall 2011 issue of JEA’s magazine, Communication : Journalism Education Today, vol. 45, no. 1.

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