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C:JET Volume 44, 2010-2011

Summer 2011, Vol. 44, #4
Click here to purchase the Summer 2011, Vol. 44, #4 issue of the JEA magazine

Cover photo by Rob Chron, Grand Blanc (Mich.) High School

Cover photo by Rob Chron, Grand Blanc (Mich.) High School

  • Alternative story forms — Yearbook design, copy and coverage have changed a lot during the previous century. Contemporary readers expect information to be readable and visually appealing. Readers also appreciate a variety of story forms. | By Bradley Wilson, CJE
  • Stylebook updates — The Associated Press Stylebook makes dozens of changes each year. Many of the updates in the last year have been about technology or world events. Review the changes and apply the knowledge with two exercises.
  • Lensbaby — a new way to see • Adding a sense of randomness to an image, the Lensbaby, like a more expensive tilt-shift lens, provides focus on one isolated area of an image. | By Brent Kitchen
  • A protocol for a sense of order • Other professions use protocols to give a defined series of steps to take when faced with an important decision. The McCormick Report provides student media with helpful and thoughtful guidance. | By Randy Swikle, CJE
  • Power of headline language • Reporters spend hours writing and rewriting every story. But often it is the headline that pulls readers into stories. Spending time writing succinct and informative headlines is a necessity. | By Judy Babb
  • A collaborative community — Professional Learning Communities are not new. But they are in vogue. They foster communication among teachers and school personnel to focus on student achievement and other educational improvement. | By Susan Benedict, MJE, Paul Restivo, CJE, Howard Spanogle and Jim Streisel, MJE

Spring 2011, Vol. 44, #3
Click here to purchase the Spring 2011, Vol. 44, #3 issue of the JEA magazine

Cover photo by Rob Chron, Grand Blanc (Mich.) High School

Cover photo by Rob Chron, Grand Blanc (Mich.) High School

  • Overtime sports option — Producing a sports magazine, at least twice a year, is a new way to provide feature coverage of aspects of athletics well beyond the game. An innovation at a California school has been popular both with athletes and with staff members. | By Kathleen Neumeyer
  • Big bucks excitement — In tough economic times, being financially viable goes beyond selling ads and subscriptions. Imaginative fundraisers provide new and innovative opportunities for staff members. | By Debra Schaefer with Jennifer Hanson and Deanne Brown
  • Power of language — Powerful words and phrases help scholastic writers produce works with style. Writers must select precise words and produce stories that are free of clichés. In every story, journalists can present a revelation for readers. | By Judy Babb
  • Portrait enterprise — The most important requirement for effective portrait photography is having a strong interest in the subject. This exploration of portrait photography presents details that may be helpful for photographers entering the JEA Write-off competition at national conventions. Readers can learn about lighting and about composition of a successful portrait. | Compiled by Bradley Wilson with Rob Chron
  • Convention instruction — Attendees at the Kansas City JEA/NSPA convention this past fall shared insights from their favorite sessions. Also, speakers at those sessions summarized their main teaching points so all JEA members can learn a few essentials. | By Gary Lundgren, Sarah Nichols, Lori Oglesbee, Griffith Simon, David Von Drehle and Scott Winter

Winter 2010, Vol. 44, #2
Click here to purchase the Winter 2010, Vol. 44, #2 issue of the JEA magazine

Cover photo by Eva Cranford, Westlake High School (Austin, Texas); Cindy Todd, adviser

Cover photo by Eva Cranford, Westlake High School (Austin, Texas); Cindy Todd, adviser

  • Game plan for coverage — Sports stories present a rich source for compelling content in all high-school media — print, online and broadcast. Going beyond the game story, successful coverage is moving into in-depth and feature topics. | By Joe Humphrey, MJE
  • First impressions — Leads invite readers, and reporters need to make their leads effective by presenting information and by grabbing readers, attention. The lead, which is important as well as difficult to write, requires practice and training. | By Howard Spanogle with Jack Kennedy, MJE, and Valerie Penton Kibler, CJE
  • Comparable coverage — Balance and fairness are cornerstones of journalism. With sports programs forced to comply with gender equity laws, media outlets would do well to spend time analyzing their coverage to see if it is fair and balanced. | By Howard Spanogle
  • Copy for notable portrayals — When reporting routine sports stories, reporters can make them memorable and enlightening by writing with style. All media outlets need to develop a style that sets them apart from other media outlets. | By Judy Babb
  • Timely sports coverage — New online media forms, such as Twitter, Facebook, SmugMug and YouTube, provide new opportunities for timely sports coverage, including on-the-spot reports from the field. Such coverage also promotes interaction with readers. | By Jed Williams
  • Moments, not snapshots — Visual storytelling of athletic activities goes beyond shooting the ball in play being dribbled, thrown, kicked or passed. It means capturing the disappointment as well as the accomplishment in lasting moments. | By Bradley Wilson, CJE, with David Boily, Jeff Grimm, Karl Grubaugh, CJE, Robert Hanashiro, Chip Litherland and Jonathan Wilk

Fall 2010, Vol. 44, #1
Click here to purchase the Fall 2010, Vol. 44, #1 issue of the JEA magazine

Cover photo by Andrew Visconti, Ward Melville High School (Setauket, N.Y.); Cortney Weisman, CJE, adviser

Cover photo by Andrew Visconti, Ward Melville High School (Setauket, N.Y.); Cortney Weisman, CJE, adviser

  • iPad path to innovation — Apple Computer’s new device, the iPad, will be the saving grace to print media, some pundits believe. Educators also see it as a potentially valuable tool. | By Bradley Wilson, CJE, Robert Gutsche, Jr. and David Schwartz
  • Niche market for magazines — Niche publications are all around us, reporting on everything from herpetology to gossip. High schools have also had success with producing magazines targeted at specific audiences. | By Kathleen Neumeyer
  • Verbs in facile form — The verb is at the heart of every sentence. It brings life and action to the subjects. A one-page primer serves as a simple reminder of the conjugations in the English language. A copy-ready exercise accompanies the primer.
  • Meetings in the hallway — Patrica Monroe of Burges High School in El Paso, Texas, has built a strong media program in newspaper, yearbook, literary magazine and photography. Her success is overshadowed only by the success of her students and program graduates. | By Scott Winter
  • Posters for journalism masters — Original posters are regular visual visitors in academic environments. They are also a simple and fast learning tool for students to show off their knowledge of various aspects of journalism history whether in print or electronic form. | By Carolyn Brown, CJE
  • Partners for communication — Experiences with diversity educate students for their careers and lives in a multicultural environment. The author presents tangible ways educators can increase the diversity in the journalism classroom and mass media environment. | By Stan Zoller, MJE