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C:JET Volume 43, 2009-2010

Cover photo by Maddi Pofahl, East Mecklenburg High School (Charlotte, N.C.); Bill Allen, adviser

Cover photo by Maddi Pofahl, East Mecklenburg High School (Charlotte, N.C.); Bill Allen, adviser

Fall 2009, Vol. 43, #1
Click here to purchase the Fall 2009, Vol. 43, #1 issue of the JEA magazine

  • The critique — A professional evaluation, whether for a yearbook, for a newspaper, for a magazine or for an online publication, is an educational tool as much as a way to get a rating. Learn how to use critiques in the classroom. | By Susan Benedict, CJE; Michele Dunaway, MJE; and Howard Spanogle
  • Washington, D. C’s Newseum — Students living near the District of Columbia share their thoughts on the Newseum, an interactive museum all about gathering the news. During the fall convention, delegates may want to visit the museum. | Gathered by LeeAnn Elias
  • Cyber-cheating — The technology that makes writing and researching so much easier also makes cheating easier. Teachers can use some Web sites and other resources to identify potentially plagiarized papers. Advisers must also be aware of the dangers for publications. | By Steve Gardiner, MJE, and Susan Tantillo, MJE
  • Newsworthy sentences — This series on the craft of writing newsworthy sentences examines how and why journalists achieve excellence in print journalism. Students concentrate on using sentence structure to make copy inviting to read and easy to understand. Connections are important for comprehension. | By David Pates
    Digital infrared techniques — Infrared photography used to be a technique reserved for those with film. Now, with camera modifications and a few tricks, the techniques can be applied to digital photography as well. | By Bradley Wilson, CJE
Cover photo by Alicia Chuchro, Glenbrook South High School (Glenview, Ill.); Brenda Field, adviser

Cover photo by Alicia Chuchro, Glenbrook South High School (Glenview, Ill.); Brenda Field, adviser


Winter 2009, Vol. 43, #2
Click here to purchase the Winter 2009, Vol. 43, #2 issue of the JEA magazine

  • Photo of the day — Pick a word out of the dictionary, a random word. Then take a photograph that illustrates that word. It is a great way to enhance vocabulary and photographic skills. And it is more difficult than it seems. | By Robert Fisher
  • Writing newsworthy sentences — English sentences with purposeful nouns, verbs, adjectives, clauses and phrases that actively and persuasively engage readers while unconsciously creating desire to “keep on reading.” | By David Pates
  • Drawing requires wit, awareness — Becoming a good cartoonist works best when students acquaint themselves with the works of artist ancestors who have excelled at social commentary. Learn from tips by a cartoonist. | By Eric Semelroth and Howard Spanogle
  • From blocks to blogs — During the 100th anniversary of Herb Block, his contributions still shape the role and the expectations of editorial cartoonists who bravely deal with the issues and the powerful. Now cartoonists are also asking, “Should we twitter?” | By Harry Katz, Michael Cavla, Carol Lange, CJE
  • Gimme the beat — A beat system is integral for media outlets from newspaper to yearbook. Beats give reporters a chance to know their sources and sources a chance to know their reporters. The interaction encourages a free exchange of ideas. | By Holly Heyser
Cover photo by Katie West, Shawnee Mission East High School, Prairie Village, Kan.; Dow Tate, adviser

Cover photo by Katie West, Shawnee Mission East High School, Prairie Village, Kan.; Dow Tate, adviser


Spring 2010, Vol. 43, #3
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  • Student life beyond the cliché — Well-rounded coverage that reflects the diversity of the school and is personalized for the year is part of every yearbook student life section. In addition, the coverage needs to be fresh, unique and innovative as numerous examples show.
  • Rugby increases in popularity — Rugby, thanks in part to a newly released movie, Invictus, continues to gain in popularity. Coverage of this organized, club or intramural sport can add depth to the sports sections of both the newspaper and yearbook. | By Bradley Wilson
  • Writing to grab readers — Writers need to focus on writing memorable stories, stories that stimulate the interests of readers. By focusing on characters and images, writers can do just that. | By Lori Oglesbee with additional material by Jack Kennedy, Don Fry and Jill Geisler
  • Conjunctions link similarities — Writers must master correct choice of prepositions and the helpful sequencing of details to enhance the connections writers make in solid reporting. Coordinate conjunctions help make the connections. | By David Pates
  • Wordle more than a toy — Wordle is a Web-based application that allows uses to create word clouds from a block of text. The tool can be used for content analysis and can even produce high-resolution PDF output for print publications. | By Bradley Wilson
Cover photo by Katie West, Shawnee Mission East High School, Prairie Village, Kan.; Dow Tate, adviser

Cover photo by Katie West, Shawnee Mission East High School, Prairie Village, Kan.; Dow Tate, adviser


Summer 2010, Vol. 43, #4
Click here to purchase the Summer 2010, Vol. 43, #4 issue of the JEA magazine

  • Shooting photos in the wild — Of course wildlife photography involves mastery of camera basics and lighting. However, it also requires patience and commitment as well as knowledge of the wildlife. | By Rob Sheppard with contributions from National
  • Wildlife photo contest
  • Writing parallel sentences — English sentences convey power and purpose when they combine nouns, verbs, adjectives, clauses and phrases in parallel style. Then the sentences actively and persuasively engage readers while unconsciously creating desire to keep on reading. | By David Pates
  • Sharing access to original work — Whereas copyright laws mean “all rights reserved,” Creative Commons is encouraging artists and authors to allow use of their work for defined circumstances and with pre-approved permission. The phrase translates to “some rights reserved.” | By Esther Wojcicki
  • Using data about data — Like an index or old-style card catalog, electronic metadata helps users find publications, images or articles. But an index or catalog is only as good as the data that are put into it. | By Bradley Wilson
  • Evaluating effect of Arkansas law — In this award-winning, peer-reviewed academic paper, two Arkansas researchers discovered that adviser training and experience seem to be more important determinants of newspaper content than a student press law. | By Jennifer R. Garner and Bruce L. Plopper
  • Targeting rhythm of color — Selecting and using colors can be part art and part science. Working from a base color and knowing essentials about color theory, designers can readily choose colors that work together to convey the message. | By Fred Perrin